Spring Fling 2019 May Bank Holiday
November News, Hundred & Under

November News, Hundred & Under

November News

For the last few weeks, I have been preparing for a couple of events. During November & December I am participating in the HUNDRED & UNDER initiative run by Upland, which has just launched for Christmas, featuring work for a hundred pounds or less by 30 Upland members. Please do take a look and spread the word to support local artists and makers.

You can find all my promotions in my shop; framed & unframed paintings for under £100, mounted photographs and poetry books. Plus up to £100 off larger artwork. This event runs until the 18th December so look out for new work being added. 

I will also be selling work through another new platform. Wasps_ Studios has created a brand new  online shop which they will be launching on Thursday 26th November. It will feature work by artists from across Scotland who are Wasps_ tenants, so this should be a good opportunity. 

This weekend I progressed some research for my next essay and made a trip to Laurieston Forest to find Lochenbreck Loch, and look at the work that has been implemented there in terms of forestry conservation. Although a working forestry site, there are a number of active projects including felling techniques, rotations and native species corridors which are encouraging.

Lochenbreck Loch
Laurieston forestry management plan

November here has been wet, misty and sunny, often all at once… I love how the mist hangs low to the ground in the morning, making atmospheric layers especially when the sunlight catches it. Some stormy weather produced big waves along the coast, quite exhilarating to watch with the gales at high tide.  

The strange almost glowing white fungi has emerged from the lawn beneath the hemlock tree again, I think it is probably wrinkled club fungus (Clavulina rugosa).

'Wrinkled club fungi' Clavulina rugosa?

A flock of rather lovely grey Herdwick sheep have moved into the low heath, amusing me by somehow squeezing under the fence to graze the garden lawn. Native to the Lake District, they are now under threat from pressures such as tourism, land use change and disease vulnerability within a confined locality, so it is encouraging to see attempts to protect them. 

 

As the last leaves disappear I am always excited to see the magnificent tree structures beneath, looking particularly spectacular in the winter cast of sunrise and sunset.

November heathland

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